2020 MLB Mock Draft: Rounds 1 & 2

From the Sports Info Solutions staff

The Sports Info Solutions Video Scouts recently conducted a two-round mock draft in conjunction with SIS’ college draft prospects series. Below is the two rounds of picks, along with a brief explanation on why each pick makes sense for that team (and links to scouting reports we’ve created on the top seven college prospects). While expected draft position is taken into account, picks are more so based on each team’s recent draft strategy, farm system composition and overall competitive outlook over the next few years.


Round 1

PickTeamPlayerPositionSchool
1Tigers Spencer Torkelson1BArizona St

While taking a first baseman at #1 is not typically the norm (Adrian Gonzalez, 2000), Torkelson’s plus hit and power tools that play to all fields are too tantalizing to pass up for Detroit.

Selected by Jeff Israel

PickTeamPlayerPositionSchool
2OriolesAustin MartinUtilityVanderbilt

Martin provides positional versatility. Having the opportunity to pair Adley Rutschman would gives the Orioles a huge boost of talent with two guys that can potentially be your No. 2 and No. 3 hitters for years to come.

Selected by Christian Chavez

PickTeamPlayerPositionSchool
3MarlinsAsa LacyLHPTexas A&M

The Marlins nab the the best fastball-slider combo (both plus-plus) in the draft in a dominant, sturdy SEC lefty. Lacy offers true ace potential to an already deep Marlins farm system, with his fastball that averages greater than 20″ of vertical movement, well above major league average.

Selected by Adam Sinkoe

PickTeamPlayerPositionSchool
4RoyalsZac VeenOFSpruce Creek HS (FL)

With a plethora of promising young pitching prospects acquired in recent drafts, the Royals will use their early first round pick to take a high-upside high school bat for the second year in a row.

Selected by Trey Lake

PickTeamPlayerPositionSchool
5Blue JaysEmerson HancockRHPGeorgia

The Blue Jays have spent 7 of their last 8 first round picks on college players. They continue that trend by selecting the high floor, high ceiling SEC right-hander. With a plus fastball, three above-average secondary pitches and ideal size size, Hancock has the makings of a future ace.

Selected by Evan Dennis

PickTeamPlayerPositionSchool
6MarinersMax MeyerRHPMinnesota

With his combination of high-90s fastball and plus-plus slider, Meyer already has the stuff to be an MLB reliever this season if needed. Though lacking in size at just 6’0″ and 185 lbs, Meyer has shown he can be an effective starter, could project as a future front-line starter for the Mariners.

Selected by Sam Waisanen

PickTeamPlayerPositionSchool
7PiratesNick Gonzales2BNew Mexico State

Pittsburgh couldn’t pass on the leader in home runs, runs, RBI, and total bases in all of college baseball through the 2020 shortened season. Gonzales will hope to join Kevin Newman in Pittsburgh to form a solid hitting duo in the middle of the infield for years to come.

Selected by Andrew Onder

PickTeamPlayerPositionSchool
8PadresReid DetmersLHPLouisville

The Padres should add to their minor league pitching depth with Detmers. He has a three-pitch mix with a devastating breaking ball. Detmers has the ability to become a front-to-mid rotation starter with his strong and durable frame.

Selected by Danny Jimenez

PickTeamPlayerPositionSchool
9RockiesRobert HassellOFIndependence (TN)

The best pure hitter in the 2020 prep class Hassell has all the tools to be a solid MLB player and even a star. With a sweet lefty swing and an already advanced approach at the plate. Hassell, a gap-to-gap hitter couldn’t ask for a better home ballpark than Coors Field.

Selected by Brandon Tew

PickTeamPlayerPositionSchool
10AngelsGarrett CrochetLHPTennessee

Any of the 4 top tier college arms would have been a tremendous value here. The Angels need front-line pitching. Crochet’s fastball has increased from 91-95 to 96-100 mph while maintaining its high spin rates. Taking him this high is a moderate risk with safer college arms available.

Selected by Matt Skiba

PickTeamPlayerPositionSchool
11White SoxNick BitskoRHPCentral Bucks East (PA)

The White Sox have built their foundation around power arms and bats as they have assumed the one of the better farm systems in baseball entering 2020. That recent trend will continue with Bitsko and his electric arsenal that reclassified from the 2021 class in January.

Selected by Tony Piraro

PickTeamPlayerPositionSchool
12RedsGarrett MitchellOFUCLA

Mitchell has been on prospect boards ever since high school and has worked on his weaknesses during his time at UCLA increasing his prospect rank. He is a five-tool talent with the strongest tool being his speed. If he is still on the board at pick No. 12, expect the Reds to draft him for a steal.

Selected by Alex Courtney

PickTeamPlayerPositionSchool
13GiantsTyler SoderstromCTurlock HS (CA)

One of the most polished prep bats in the draft, Soderstrom has impressed scouts with his athletic ability to move around the field. A 6’2 frame that will have the ability to fill out as he gets older, makeup off the charts, I believe San Francisco likes the high-ceiling prep bat here at 13.

Selected by Darren Trainor

PickTeamPlayerPositionSchool
14RangersTanner BurnsRHPAuburn

Hiding in plain sight for much of his college career at Auburn, Burns consistently navigated the toughest SEC competition with great poise and success. While durability concerns loom, his experience and ability to command pitches at an advanced level makes him a great fit.

Selected by Andrew Delzotto

PickTeamPlayerPositionSchool
15PhilliesHeston KjerstadOFArkansas

Kjerstad has received notoriety from scouts for being the best left-handed power hitter in this year’s draft class. Given the Phillies lack of organizational depth in the outfield, they search for long-term options alongside Bryce Harper in the outfield.

Selected by Joseph Wittreich

PickTeamPlayerPositionSchool
16CubsCade CavalliRHPOklahoma

The Cubs tend to draft college players early in drafts, and Cavalli fills the need for pitching depth in their rebuilding minor league system. He brings effortless velocity, a nasty curveball, and the potential to develop 2-3 more really solid pitches.

Selected by Vince DiSilvio

PickTeamPlayerPositionSchool
17Red SoxBryce JarvisRHPDuke

An organization in desperate need of starting pitching, the Red Sox try to get some help from a class loaded with it. Jarvis fits the starting pitching mold with four average-to-above offerings, and plus control. Also his dad Kevin played 13 seasons in the majors; his last with the Boston Red Sox.

Selected by Corey Leaden

PickTeamPlayerPositionSchool
18D- BacksPete Crow-ArmstrongOFHarvard- Westlake HS (CA)

Potential 5-tool outfielder, from a high school that has produced numerous major league players. A Vanderbilt commit; which are usually tougher to sign. The upside is worth the risk for the D-Backs holding another first round pick.

Selected by Justin Stine

PickTeamPlayerPositionSchool
19MetsMick AbelRHPJesuit (OR)

After letting Wheeler walk and trading away their fourth-and-sixth best prospects for Stroman, both pitchers, they double down on the position after drafting Matthew Allan in the second round last year hoping to replenish it.

Selected by Alexander Arcidiacono

PickTeamPlayerPositionSchool
20BrewersPatrick BaileyCNC State

An organization that is desperate for farm system talent gets their guy here at No. 20. Bailey a switch hitting catcher that has shown plus power in his time at NC State gives the Brewers another strong potential backstop in their minor league ranks.

Selected by Luke Iorio

PickTeamPlayerPositionSchool
21CardinalsEd HowardSSMount Carmel (IL)

Howard has good middle-infield defensive ability and offensive upside. The consensus for Howard is that he is a top-15 pick, so the Cardinals are glad to get him here at 21.

Selected by Allen Ho

PickTeamPlayerPositionSchool
22NationalsCole WilcoxRHPGeorgia

Wilcox honored his commitment to Georgia after the Nationals drafted him out of high achool in 2018. An organization that usually goes with college pitching in the first round, the Nationals should pounce on another chance to have Wilcox, and his mid-90s fastball.

Selected by Corey Eiferman

PickTeamPlayerPositionSchool
23IndiansAustin HendrickOFWest Allegheny HS (PA)

Since 2016, The Indians have used all of their first-round picks on high school talent. They continue to go in that direction by taking Hendrick. Hendrick’s combination of athleticism and power give the Indians a potential high impact bat in the outfield.

Selected by Ben Jaffy

PickTeamPlayerPositionSchool
24RaysCasey MartinSSArkansas

The Rays have one of the strongest farm systems in the MLB. They now have the ability to take a risk and draft someone with high upside. Casey Martin fits that mold with concerns about his hit ability, but an extremely high ceiling.

Selected by Chris Dominguez

PickTeamPlayerPositionSchool
25BravesJared KelleyRHPRefugio (TX)

In 2019 the Braves went safe in what was probably their last year with high picks for the foreseeable future. Kelley has a natural feel for the art of pitching and knows how to work the strike zone, both of which are traits that the Braves know how to develop and capitalize on.

Selected by Sales Pinckney

PickTeamPlayerPositionSchool
26AthleticsBobby MillerRHPLouisville

The Athletics have used their late first-round picks to pick high ceiling college talent and Miller fits that mold with two high velocity fastballs that he is able to blow by hitters. Miller ranks among the hardest throwers in this year’s Draft.

Selected by Bryan Borruso

PickTeamPlayerPositionSchool
27TwinsDillon DinglerCOhio State

The draft can go a lot of ways for them and if given the opportunity to take Dingler, C, Ohio State, the Twins will to fill in the lack of depth they have behind the plate as an organization. Dingler is a catcher with pop who hit .291 in his sophomore effort with 14 extra base hits including 3 home runs.

Selected by Ethan Young

PickTeamPlayerPositionSchool
28YankeesClayton BeeterRHPTexas Tech

Beeter features a fastball in the mid-90s that can reach the upper-90s. The 6’2″ right-hander had Tommy John surgery before his freshman season, and while there are concerns about his durability, his upside could be too much for the Yankees to pass on.

Selected by Brendon Baker

PickTeamPlayerPositionSchool
29DodgersAustin WellsCArizona

With defensive minded catcher Keibert Ruiz already in the system, an offensive first catcher is a great option for the Dodgers. Wells is a powerful left-handed hitter with above-average bat control that can be moved around in the field to ensure his bat is in the lineup.

Selected by Stephen Marciello

Competitive Balance Round A

PickTeamPlayerPositionSchool
30OriolesJustin LangeRHPLlano HS (TX)

Lange might be the biggest question mark in this draft. His velocity increased from low 90s to touching 100 but wasn’t super consistent in the shortened spring season. With the Orioles in the middle of a rebuild and still many years from a playoff run they have time to develop him.

Selected by Payton Kuhnel

PickTeamPlayerPositionSchool
31PiratesSlade CecconiMiamiMiami

The Pirates need some help in their starting pitching rotation, and Cecconi would be a perfect fit. Cecconi has a 4.09 ERA with 119 strikeouts in 101 1/3 innings in parts of 2 seasons with Miami, including a 3.80 ERA and 30 strikeouts in 21 1/3 innings in four starts.

Selected by Drew Onder

PickTeamPlayerPositionSchool
32RoyalsCarmen MlodzinskiRHPSouth Carolina

The Royals could go a number of different ways here, but since they grabbed a position player with their first selection, they will elect to draft a pitcher here and add to their stockpile of talented young arms. The Royals love their pitching prospects, and Mlodzinski is a first round talent.

Selected by Trey Lake

PickTeamPlayerPositionSchool
33D-BacksJustin Foscue2BMississippi State

After going high risk high reward with first pick, the D-Backs go with a safer option here in a college bat with under slot potential. Foscue also offers infield defensive flexibility, and someone who should be a solid depth piece if not more.

Selected by Justin Stine

PickTeamPlayerPositionSchool
34PadresIsaiah GreeneOFCorona HS (CA)

This left handed hitting outfielder will bring skills that the Padres are lacking at the major league level. Greene has an athletic built and is very fast on the base paths. He has the speed to be a major league center fielder.

Selected by Danny Jimenez

PickTeamPlayerPositionSchool
35RockiesAaron Sabato1BNorth Carolina

With the universal DH possibly on the horizon the Rockies could just take the best power bat available. Sabato has exceptional strength from the right-handed batter’s box, with average defense. He has a bat and approach that could flourish at Coors Field.

Selected by Brandon Tew

PickTeamPlayerPositionSchool
36IndiansSeth LonswayLHPOhio State

The Indians have done a very good job of developing pitching. Lonsway possess one of the best curveballs in this year’s draft. Cleveland should feel confident that their development can help Lonsway make the most of his stuff and become a major league starter.

Selected by Ben Jaffy

PickTeamPlayerPositionSchool
37RaysDaniel CabreraOFLSU

The only “weakness” in the Rays farm system (if there is any) involves too many question marks in the outfield. Drafting a pure hitter like Daniel Cabrera gives the Rays more optimism in that area.

Selected by Chris Dominguez

Round 2

PickTeamPlayerPositionSchool
38TigersNick LoftinSSBaylor

Loftin played five positions with Team USA last summer, showing off his plus instincts and a strong hit tool displayed with (Baylor, Cape Cod, Team USA).

Selected by Jeff Israel

PickTeamPlayerPositionSchool
39OriolesChris McMahonRHPMiami

McMahon improved every year and had a 1.05 ERA in 25 innings pitched before play was stopped this year. At 6’2 217, he has a solid build and provides plus stuff to miss the big bats of the AL East.

Selected by Christian Chavez

PickTeamPlayerPositionSchool
40MarlinsJordan Walker3BDecatur HS (GA)

Miami has shown a clear preference for high-risk high-reward players under the 2 years of new ownership, and with no third basemen in their top 30 prospects, prep bat Jordan Walker fits the bill.

Selected by Adam Sinkoe

PickTeamPlayerPositionSchool
41RoyalsDrew RomoCThe Woodlands (TX)

The Royals have a recent track record of being able to sign away high school catchers (Melendez, 2017) and will take a chance they can do the same with Romo, a switch-hitting catcher.

Selected by Trey Lake

PickTeamPlayerPositionSchool
42Blue JaysBlaze Jordan1BDeSoto Central HS (MS)

More than just a plus-power hitter, he was the No. 1 recruit in the class of 2021 before reclassifying. Jordan comes with elite makeup and a very high ceiling.

Selected by Evan Dennis

PickTeamPlayerPositionSchool
43MarinersYohandy Morales3BBraddock HS (FL)

With a lack of depth in their farm system at third base, the Mariners decide to draft a project player with high upside in Yohandy Morales. Standing at 6’4″, Morales already displays plus raw power.

Selected by Sam Waisanen

PickTeamPlayerPositionSchool
44PiratesChase DavisOFFranklin HS (CA)

Chase Davis has a cannon for an arm and has been clocked throwing 99 mph from the outfield. This pick could prove to be a solid depth piece for the Pirates, but also has the potential to be a star.

Selected by Andrew Onder

PickTeamPlayerPositionSchool
45PadresCarson MontgomeryRHPWindermere Prep HS (FL)

Carson has the ability to become a either a back of the bullpen pitcher or a front-end starter. The Padres could develop Carson to help out their pitching staff.

Selected by Danny Jimenez

PickTeamPlayerPositionSchool
46RockiesCade HortonRHP/ SSNorman (OK)

Signability is a major concern as he’s committed to play two sports at Oklahoma. The future Sooners QB might have a high asking price. Rockies get a compensation pick if they are unable to sign him.

Selected by Brandon Tew

PickTeamPlayerPositionSchool
47White SoxJ.T GinnRHPMississippi State

Chicago’s love for SEC talent leads the White Sox to their prized pitching prospect from Mississippi State. In 2019, the Sox selected seven pitchers with their first 10 picks and it continues here in 2020.

Selected by Tony Piraro

PickTeamPlayerPositionSchool
48RedsC.J Van EykRHPFlorida State

The Reds would more than likely use their second draft pick for a pitcher after picking up a much-needed outfielder in the first round. The Reds’ top prospects are mostly position players.

Selected by Alex Courtney

PickTeamPlayerPositionSchool
49GiantsJared JonesRHPLa Mirada HS (CA)

Jones’s has a fairly strong commitment to Texas. San Francisco would be betting on the ceiling of the pure stuff that Jones possess as an 18-year-old with signability concerns.

Selected by Darren Trainor

PickTeamPlayerPositionSchool
50RangersAlika WilliamsSSArizona State

Sticking to the theme of adding seasoned college players with the ability to rise through the system quickly, Williams makes perfect sense here in Round 2 as a defensive minded shortstop

Selected by Andrew Delzotto

PickTeamPlayerPositionSchool
51CubsLogan AllenLHPFlorida International

With both Jose Quintana and Jon Lester’s contracts ending by 2022, the Cubs are going to need major league ready pitching soon, and there isn’t much of that in their farm system right now.

Selected by Vince DiSilvio

PickTeamPlayerPositionSchool
52MetsHudson HaskinOFTulane

He can help fill the Mets’ void in their farm system left by the Jared Kelenic trade. Specifically, none of their top 15 prospects are outfielders and only three are in the top 30 (according to MLB pipeline).

Selected by Alexander Arcidiacono 

PickTeamPlayerPositionSchool
53BrewersAlex SantosRHPMount St. Michael Academy (NY)

The formula for winning baseball games today is clear: power. The Brewers add a young power arm here at pick 53 with Alex Santos. At just 18 years old Santos is already hitting 95 on the radar.

Selected by Luke Iorio 

PickTeamPlayerPositionSchool
54CardinalsDax FultonLHPMustang (OK)

Although their farm system top arms are all left handed (Matthew Liberatore, Zack Thompson and Genesis Cabrera), it’s only because they get Kwang Hyun Kim as the lone option for big leagues.

Selected by Allen Ho

PickTeamPlayerPositionSchool
55NationalsCole HenryRHPLSU

Despite not having quite the experience, the Nationals shouldn’t shy away from using both of their first two picks on draft-eligible college sophomore pitchers.

Selected by Corey Eiferman

PickTeamPlayerPositionSchool
56IndiansMasyn WinnRHP/ SSKingwood (TX)

Winn is one of the rare prospects that has a legitimate future either as a pitcher or a position player. On the mound, he pairs a 98-mph fastball with a plus curveball and a changeup.

Selected by Ben Jaffy 

PickTeamPlayerPositionSchool
57RaysBen HernandezRHPDe La Salle Institute (IL)

Nothing wrong with having too much pitching! The Rays have been a model organization for developing pitchers for years. Hernandez adds to their already potentially strong future rotation.

Selected by Chris Dominguez 

PickTeamPlayerPositionSchool
58AthleticsJeff CriswellRHPMichigan

Criswell maintained his stuff and velocity when transitioning from reliever to starter. If he can do a better job of locating his pitches, he could develop into a mid-rotation starter.

Selected by Bryan Borruso 

PickTeamPlayerPositionSchool
59TwinsTanner WittRHPEpiscopal (TX)

At 6’6″ Witt is a long, young, high upside prospect. The trouble will be getting him to turn down his commitment to Texas which, if he does, could make him a steal late in the second round.

Selected by Ethan Young

PickTeamPlayerPositionSchool
60DodgersJordan WestburgSSMississippi State

Westburg is a big shortstop with a lot of power in his bat and plus defensive prowess. With the ability to also play third base, Westburg’s power bat will quickly carry him through the minors.

Selected by Stephen Marciello 

Competitive Balance Round B

PickTeamPlayerPositionSchool
61MarlinsJared ShusterLHPWake Forest

His steady improvement every year in college utilizing data and technology is telling about his aptitude. It gives him a good chance to reach his potential of solid middle of the rotation starter.

Selected by Adam Sinkoe

PickTeamPlayerPositionSchool
62TigersNick GarciaRHPChapman University

Taking a Division III pitcher with little track record as a starter at No. 62 may seem a little out there, but Garcia’s stuff is worth this selection especially after a solid summer in the Cape Cod League.

Selected by Jeff Israel

PickTeamPlayerPositionSchool
63CardinalsTommy MaceRHPFlorida

After picking a left-handed pitcher with the second-round pick, the Cardinals could use a right-handed pitcher to bolster their minor league depth also featuring a plus cutter to build on.

Selected by Allen Ho

PickTeamPlayerPositionSchool
64MarinersCarson TuckerSSMountain Pointe HS (AZ)

Brother of Pirates SS Cole Tucker, Carson is a lanky 6’2″ shortstop with plenty of room to develop. While not excelling in any one area, Tucker provides a well-balanced skillset across the board.

Selected by Sam Waisanen

PickTeamPlayerPositionSchool
65RedsJake EderLHPVanderbilt

He has had troubles with consistency and placement during his time at Vandy, the team would surely look at honing in on the southpaw’s abilities. He would be a mistake to pass on at this point.

Selected by Alex Courtney

PickTeamPlayerPositionSchool
66DodgersBurl CarrawayLHPDallas Baptist

Regarded as the best reliever and most MLB-ready player in this draft, this left-hander can reach the high 90s with the fastball with a plus-plus curveball can be an excellent addition to the Dodgers.

Selected by Stephen Marciello

Free Agent Compensation Picks

PickTeamPlayerPositionSchool
67GiantsDaniel SusacCJesuit HS (CA)

Although the Giants took Soderstrom in the first round and Joey Bart knocking on the door at the big league level, they are betting on Susac developing into a catcher with power and arm strength.

Selected by Darren Trainor

PickTeamPlayerPositionSchool
68GiantsCaden GriceOF/ LHPRiverside HS (SC)

Teams that put heavy emphasis on algorithms on age, height, weight, skill rave about Grice who could go in the second round does have a commitment to Clemson but carries great upside.

Selected by Darren Trainor

PickTeamPlayerPositionSchool
69MetsKyle HarrisonLHPDe La Salle (CA)

One of the best left-handers at this point in the draft, might as well gamble for a position that is relatively expensive to pay in free agency (LHP). He has a deceptive delivery, and good control.

Selected by Alexander Arcidiacono

PickTeamPlayerPositionSchool
70CardinalsDrew Bowser3BHarvard-Westlake (CA)

Cardinals can opt for offensive upside here to raise the ceiling for their big league lineup in the future. Bowser is still young enough at 18 and needs time to develop.

Selected by Allen Ho

PickTeamPlayerPositionSchool
71NationalsGage Workman3BArizona State

It’s impossible to replace the most vital position player on a World Series team, but with the departure of Anthony Rendon, the Nationals need to get some close-to-MLB ready talent at 3B.

Selected by Corey Eiferman

PickTeamPlayerPositionSchool
72AstrosNick SwineyLHPNC State

The Astros could use a LHP in their starting rotation and bullpen as well. He spent two seasons as a middle reliever for the Wolfpack where he went 11-1 and moved to the starting rotation in 2020.

Selected by Drew Onder 

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